“LifeLoggers: Chronicling the Everyday” at the Elmhurst Art Museum, IL / May-Aug 2014

LifeLoggers: Chronicling the Everyday
Curated by Rachel Seligman, Tang Museum at Skidmore College
and Nadine Wasserman, Independent Curator

Elmhurst Art Museum, Elmhurst, IL /  May 11 – August 17, 2014

Chicago Tribune Review July 31 2014, by Lori Waxman                                    Quote: “Artist Leona Christie takes cues from her brother Gavin, who is autistic and has an immense capacity for storing and organizing facts. He ritually hand writes and types blocky lists of MTV New Year specials watched, dates when shorts have been worn, travel details for driving 15 miles to Flint, Mich. She absorbs his intensity in a series of pristine, white-on-white prints that embed these inventories in the surface of heavy white paper, as if by sheer force.”

01_All_the_New_Years_Days_Christie copy

Above: All the MTV New Year’s Eve Specials, 15″ x 12,” debossed engraving, 2010-12

Chicago Sun-times, Western Springs edition

“Lifeloggers” was first exhibited at the Perlman Teaching Museum, Carleton College, Northfield, MN / January 10 – March 16, 2014

‘So to Speak’ examines artistic power of language, by Amy Griffin, Times-Union

PRESS: Albany Times-Union

From article: “In her book, Leona Christie notes that Gavin read (and reread) the biography of Scarry who, as a child, made lists in the form of drawings. What Gavin does is an inversion of this — processing images into words and, by presenting them on a large scale, his sister-collaborator effectively makes images of his words.”

“Lists and Projects,” article in the College Hill Independent, 2012

“Lists and Projects” by Claudia Norton, College Hill Independent

The “Dark Woods, Light Woods” project in the RISD / Brown University student newspaper:

“She (Leona) didn’t see Gavin’s lists as artistically significant until she studied art in college and was introduced to Ed Ruscha’s “Every Building on the Sunset Strip” (1966), a comprehensive photo documentation of every building on the Sunset Strip in Hollywood. Leona explained, “Ruscha’s piece taught me that deadpan delivery of visual information—when it carried social, poetic, or emotional content—could be art.” Leona told the Independent that she has taken on the task of translating Gavin’s projects “from an ephemeral medium (word processor ink on copy paper) to an archival medium (fine art printmaking).”

Gavin is something of an archivist, and Leona considers herself an archivist of his archives. His lists are repetitive and sometimes fictionalized. In a video documenting the pair’s road trip to Chicago, posted on their blog darkwoodslightwoods.wordpress.com, Gavin records the business hours of a bakery as opening one hour earlier and closing one hour later than stated on the sign. In a talk that Leona gave at Brown on October 25th, she pointed out that Gavin, in documenting dates of births and marriages, always records them as one year earlier—retroactively extending their duration, if only in his archive. He calls this time “extra bonus days.” When the Independent asked him when he began considering his lists ‘projects’ he said, “The real life version answer is June 30, 1990. The fictionalized version answer is July 1st, 1989.”

Catalogue essay by Dr. Darrold A Treffert for “Hiding Places” Exhibition at the Kohler Arts Center

CATALOGUE ESSAY by Dr. Darrold A Treffert (autistic savant expert) and Leslie Umberger, curator, for the “Hiding Places: Memory & the Arts” exhibition at the Kohler Art Center, Sheboygan, WI.